Category Archives: Pollinators

Most Pollinator Friendly Villages Award

Bee Friendly Monmouthshire awarded two houses in St. Arvans near Chepstow on Tuesday 9th Jan 2018 with Certificates of Recognition for Bee Friendly Gardens. BfM participated in the Gwent Best Kept Village 2017, and during the judging for Most Polli-Friendly Village, found some very wonderful pollinator friendly gardens amongst them.

We wanted to highlight them, and congratulate them. One of the winners commented, “I’ve never received an award for doing nothing before!” and that is what we at BfM want to encourage. We want to encourage more pollinator-friendly people to leave those pesky dandelions, to allow that mischievous ivy to flower, and to leave that haircut for the grass a little longer. 2018 should be the year of the pollinator.

Many congratulations to the winners, and we hope to see more polli-friendly gardens this year.

Plant a pot for pollinators

Join the Butterfly Conservation’s Plant a Pot for Pollinators project:-,0,0,0,0


Dorset Council Pollinator Action Plan

Dorset has become the latest council to take steps to help Britain’s bees to thrive.  At its Cabinet meeting in June Dorset County Council agreed to adopt a pollinator action plan.

Crucially its plan includes banning bee-harming neonicotinoid pesticides wherever it can.

Dorset’s plan proposes other bee-friendly actions. The cutting of hedges and grass verges will be changed to offer more food and shelter for bees. And native wildflowers, trees and shrubs will become more widespread in planting schemes.

Polli-Nation survey

Polli:Nation is a UK wide initiative supporting pupils from 260 schools to turn their school grounds and other local walk-to spaces into pollinator friendly habitats. To do this schools are encouraged to:

  •  Survey their patch using the new OPAL Polli:Nation survey (available May 2016)
  •  Make improvements for pollinators on their patch
  •  See how well it has worked using the OPAL survey to see the   impact the improvements have had.

This cross-curricula secondary and primary school project will give pupils direct hands-on experiences; from creating vertical green walls and night-blooming flower beds to lobbying to change school maintenance regimes and debating pesticide use. Pupils will learn about the role pollinating insects play in eco system services and be able to contextualise this in the choices and actions they take.

Alongside creating a network of knowledgeable and enthused young activists, the ambition of this programme is to utilise school grounds to form local green corridors and ‘stepping stones’, enabling species to move between core areas thereby contributing to the overall aim of the project by increasing numbers and sightings of pollinating insects in the UK.


Bees and other pollinators are in dire need of help – Washington Post

An unprecedented scientific report says bees and other pollinators are in dire need of help says the Washington Post.

Around the world, the animals that pollinate our food crops — over 20,000 species of bees, butterflies, bats and many others — are the subject of growing attention. An increasing number of pollinator species are thought to be in decline, threatened by a variety of mostly human pressures, and their struggles could pose significant risks for global food security and public health.

Until now, most assessments of pollinator health have been conducted on a regional basis, focusing on certain countries or parts of the world. But this week, a United Nations organization has released the first-ever global assessment of pollinators, highlighting their importance for worldwide food and nutrition, describing the threats they currently face and outlining strategies to protect them.